WWF-Malaysia in Full Support of Plastic Straw Ban | WWF Malaysia

WWF-Malaysia in Full Support of Plastic Straw Ban



Posted on 26 September 2018
Plastic and trash found around the coasts of Sabah.
© WWF-Malaysia / Marine Programme
Kuala Lumpur: WWF-Malaysia applauds the ban on plastic straws starting 1 January 2019 in the Federal Territories of Kuala Lumpur, Putrajaya and Labuan.

This ban is included as a renewal requirement for business licenses, with full enforcement beginning 1 January 2020. This provides a one-year grace period to provide themselves for compliance with the new regulation. Awareness campaigns throughout the year will enable public to understand the importance for this movement, so businesses and consumers alike will be able to move with this change together.

“The ban will encourage those who have yet to take the first step to reduce or stop the use of plastic straws, and further motivate the business and individuals who have already been in this initiative,” says Dr Henry Chan, Conservation Director of WWF-Malaysia.

The upcoming ban addresses concerns of customers who require plastic straws for medical reasons with Federal Territories Ministry secretary-general Datuk Seri Adnan Mohd Ikhsan explaining that business operators who provide for this reason will not be penalised.

“While the use of metal, bamboo, and paper straws opens another debate alongside the question of completely biodegradable materials, WWF-Malaysia believes this is a fantastic first step towards the sustainability of our environment. This ban is translated from concern and initiative by our Government, businesses, and members of the public.”

WWF-Malaysia strives towards the benefit of our future generations by working to stop the degradation of the planet’s natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature. Dedicated effort by each person to saving the environment is in turn, saving humankind.

“The plastic waste that humans do not think twice about using mostly end up in the ocean. There are many cases where these plastic that end up in the ocean impact marine life. A pilot whale died due to ingesting 4.8 kg of plastic in 2015 and more recently in May 2018, an infant pilot whale was also found dead due to plastic in our waters. Plastic in the ocean also turns into microplastic. Marine life consuming microplastic means that when we consume fish products, we too are consuming microplastic. Do you actually know where your food source comes from?” laments Dr Chan.

“Alarmingly, Dame Ellen MacArthur is warning that by 2050, there will be more waste plastic in the sea than fish unless the industry cleans up its act. Zooming even closer to home is the recent circulating news on the alarming mountains of plastic waste in Jenjarom, Malaysia. It further reinforces WWF-Malaysia’s notion of reducing single-use plastic and the total support of this ban. In the long term, Malaysia should also address and find solution for our own plastic waste including the root cause of dependence on plastic and finding a sustainable solution to waste management,” he concludes.

WWF-Malaysia urges everyone to reduce, and eventually stop single-use plastic for maintaining healthy marine ecosystems as their survival affects human survival in the end. It is WWF-Malaysia’s hope to for Malaysians to come on board this as a nation.

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For more information, please contact:
Kimberly Chung
Senior Communications and Campaigns Officer, Marine Programme, WWF-Malaysia (Sabah office)
Tel: +60 88 262 420, Ext.127
Email: kchung@wwf.org.my
Plastic and trash found around the coasts of Sabah.
© WWF-Malaysia / Marine Programme Enlarge
Plastic and trash found around the coasts of Sabah.
© WWF-Malaysia / Marine Programme Enlarge
Plastic and trash found around the coasts of Sabah.
© WWF-Malaysia / Marine Programme Enlarge