MALAYSIANS UNITE TO FREEZE TIGER TRADE | WWF Malaysia

MALAYSIANS UNITE TO FREEZE TIGER TRADE



Posted on 30 July 2011
Participants of the Freeze Tiger Trade event attracted a great deal of attention.
© WWF-Malaysia/ Christopher Wong
30th July 2010, Kuala Lumpur – Through a series of well-choreographed steps, a tiger-themed flash mob called “Freeze Tiger Trade” spearheaded by WWF-Malaysia’s Tx2 Campaign turned heads and attracted attention on the status of our Malayan tigers here in Kuala Lumpur on 30th July 2010.

People from all walks of life surprised patrons of Pavilion Kuala Lumpur by collapsing on the floor – representing wild tigers that have been hunted and traded – and freezing in that position for four minutes. The same group later took the crowd by surprise again with a second flash mob, this time a dance routine to a medley of four songs.

This first ever tiger-themed flash mob in the world was organised as part of an awareness activity following World Tiger Day on July 29th.

This act of unity among Malaysians showed that they are supportive of the Malaysian government’s aim to end all tiger trade by stepping up enforcement and habitat protection, thus helping to double tiger numbers by the next Year of the Tiger (2022).

Rehearsals prior to “Freeze Tiger Trade” were conducted twice a week and consisted of dance and freeze practices, along with a presentation on Malaysia’s tiger conservation efforts that heavily promoted the Wildlife Crime Hotline (019 356 4194) to be programmed in participants’ mobile phones.

Tx2 Tiger Ambassador, Sazzy Falak, also encouraged her fans to attend rehearsals and helped draw the crowd to the Freeze Tiger Trade venue.

This is the first time that WWF-Malaysia utilised only new media in publicising an event and calling for participants. With a boost from supporters that include Leo Burnett & Arc Asia Pacific, ChurpChurp, NuffNang, EcoKnights, Wild Asia, All Malaysia Bloggers Project, Youth Asia, Facebook group KL Flash Mob (dance), and venue partner Pavilion Kuala Lumpur, “Freeze Tiger Trade” was publicised mainly through blogs, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.
 
Participants of the Freeze Tiger Trade event attracted a great deal of attention.
© WWF-Malaysia/ Christopher Wong Enlarge