The Voyage of Our Turtles: Puteri Pulau Upeh | WWF Malaysia

The Voyage of Our Turtles: Puteri Pulau Upeh



 
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Location and movement of Puteri Pulau Upeh

Turtle Name:
Puteri Pulau Upeh
Named by YB Datuk Haji Md. Yunos bin Husin, the State Chairman of Rural and Agriculture Development Committee

Current Location
Singaporean waters (South of Singapore)
as of 22 February 2007

Deployment Location
Pulau Upeh, Melaka

Deployment Date
29 August 2006

Flipper Tag Numbers
MY4488/MY4489

Curved Carapace Length (Shell Length)
78.70cm

Curved Carapace Width (Shell Width)
71.90cm

Weight
38.5kg
The turtle named Puteri Pulau Upeh with the satellite transmitter attached. 
	© WWF-Malaysia/Carrol Lawrence
The turtle named Puteri Pulau Upeh with the satellite transmitter attached.
© WWF-Malaysia/Carrol Lawrence

Biography

Puteri Pulau Upeh was first spotted on 29 July 2006 as she was nesting. She laid 108 eggs in an unusually shallow pit which she dug, on Pulau Upeh. The area where she nested was not easily accessible as it was obstructed by logs and infested with ants. She had what appeared to be the remains of a fishing net stuck in a crack on her carapace (the back of a turtle's shell). The fishing net and some barnacles were removed from her carapace and she was tagged with the tags numbers MY4488/MY4489. Judging by the size and appearance of her shell, it can be assumed that she was a young nester.

A KIWISAT 101 satellite transmitter was attached onto her shell on 29 August 2006, after her third nesting for the season. She was released at 2.20am the same night and was officially named Puteri Pulau Upeh by the State Chairman of Rural and Agriculture Development Committee, YB Datuk Haji Md. Yunos bin Husin.

Puteri Pulau Upeh begun her journey southwards on 14 September 2006. She crossed over to Singapore waters approximately two weeks later and has been detected at the southern island of Singapore ever since. She may be feeding amongst the patches coral reefs still existing around the area.